Why Kids' Cake Boxes?


Social distancing sure is hard on all of us, but especially on our children. Getting pulled out of in-person schooling, activities, sports, and play dates has created bigger and sadder emotions in our little ones.

I know my kids were all affected by the new social distancing rules when they were put into place. Especially with being taken out of in-person school; that was a big one. In particular, my second son really became withdrawn and developed an overall feeling of sadness when he was taken away from his normal social interactions. I was worried, as any mom would be, and I was determined to help him climb out of his sadness. 

As time ticked on, it seemed the more parents I talked to, the more I realized this wasn't a particularly unique reaction to the loss of "normalcy." Some kiddos demonstrated strong, displaced emotions while others reacted a bit more extremely. But, none the less, it was apparent that our kids had been negatively affected. It was just too much. On top of it all, I looked around and watched as child after child "missed" their birthday. Sure, we all still tried to make it a special day for them at home, but there was still a sense of loss. I talked to one mom who perfectly summed it up when she said, "Whelp, there goes her 7th birthday."

Childhood is, quite frankly, too short to miss a birthday. And it wasn't just the birthday kid missing out. All the guests that would have been at the party were missing out, too. Missing out on those fun, memorable birthday times with friends. And the crux of every party is the cake, which they were also now missing out on. I don't think I've ever attended a party where the kids haven't asked, "when do we get to eat cake?" And now, all of a sudden, there was no cake for the guests to eat at all. 

Like all parents out there, our kids' sadness created a sadness in us as well. Watching birthdays disappear was sad. And birthdays are days every child should get to have. And we're trying; we really are. Drive-by birthday honks and virtual parties are a good idea. But, oh, that cake. How could we celebrate together with cake again? 

I wanted to help so that our kids could again feel like they were going to a birthday party together. If I could help make these birthdays be just a little bit happier so that they didn't just "pass by," I wanted to try. 

And so, Kids' Cake Boxes was born. 

Now when kids log on to see their friends blowing out a birthday candle, they don't just have to watch that friend eat cake and then log off. Now, they can all eat cake together, kind of like they used to do. 

I hope your kids find enjoyment eating cake with their friends again. This new, hopefully temporary, "normal" is hard on all of us. But keep fighting the good fight for your kids. Social distancing will end one day and we'll join each other again to celebrate in person. And pass the cake. 

In it together, 
Karen